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Body Surface Area (BSA)

Body Surface Area (BSA)

Body Surface Area (BSA) is the total surface of the human body. This measurement is used in the medical field to help determine the appropriate dosages of medicine and the amount of IV fluids that need to be administered.

Body Surface Area has many different formulas for calculating the number, each with slightly different results. The most commonly used formula now is that of Mosteller, published in 1987 in The New England Journal of Medicine. Mosteller’s derived a simplified calculation in metric terms. The body surface area = the square root of product of the weight

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BMI (Body Mass Index)

BMI (Body Mass Index)

Body Mass Index (BMI), is a general “rule of thumb” measurement to estimating human body fat based on an individual’s weight and height. BMI offers a correlation to other direct methods of measuring body fat, but BMI does not actually measure the percentage of body fat. Basically BMI offers a reliable indicator of body fatness.

BMI is an inexpensive and easy method that can be used as a screening method for unhealthy weight categories that may lead to health issues.

BMI is defined as the individual’s body mass divided by the square of his or her

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Metabolism and Metabolic Rate

Metabolism and Metabolic Rate

Metabolism and metabolic rate play a role together in the human bodies need for energy and energy balance. Metabolism and metabolic rate define our bodies energy use. Metabolism is the total amount of energy our physiological actions require, while metabolic rate refers to the grand total of of all energy used in the body. Metabolism and metabolic rate are classified differently where metabolic rate is broken down further into the categories of: basil metabolic rate (BMR), resting metabolic rate (RMR), thermal effect of feeding (TEF), exercise activity, and non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT). From my article Continue Reading: Metabolism and Metabolic Rate

Protein Metabolism

Protein Metabolism: Energy Transfer and ATP

Protein Metabolism is an important role in producing ATP, along with the other macronutreints (carbohydrates and fats). Protein Metabolism accomplishes this through the energy transfer pathways just as carbohydrate metabolism and fat metabolism play their respective roles in the energy transfer pathways. Simply stated, the energy transfer pathways are where the process of breaking down the carbon-hydrogen bonds that are in the foods we eat into ATP for energy.

Protein is an important component of every cell, tissue, and organ in our body. One of the main functions

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Fat Metabolism

Fat Metabolism

Fat metabolism takes place during the three main Energy Transfer Process which are designed to break down this macronutrient’s (along with carbohydrates and proteins) chemical bonds to form ATP. Although most people have a negative connotation of fats, they are extremely important for good health and in achieving maximum performance. Fats play many roles in our bodies such as: regulation of hormones, transport vitamins and minerals through the body, are structurally important (along with triglycerides) in our plasma, and they are our largest source of energy in the body.

Our body is capable of synthesizing our own

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Carbohydrate Metabolism

Carbohydrate Metabolism

Carbohydrate Metabolism is an important role in producing ATP, along with the other macronutreints (fats and proteins). Carbohydrate metabolism takes place during the three main Energy Transfer Process which are designed to break down this macronutrient’s (along with fats and proteins) chemical bonds to form ATP. Carbohydrates are very important for good nutrition in your diet. They are our bodies fastest macronutrient source of energy, but they are stored in our body in very limited quantities. A typical 150 pound person may have about 1.1 pounds of stored glucose in their body which is only about

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ATP and Energy Transfer Processes

ATP and Energy Transfer Processes

ATP and Energy Transfer Processes supplies the energy to perform every bodily action. ATP is required for every muscle contraction, and ATP is even needed to make more ATP. In my article What is ATP, I discusses what ATP is in depth.

A high-level view of what ATP is and does is that ATP (Adenosine Triphosphate) is needed for practically every action in our body. Or put another way, ATP is the energy source for all human movement. Through the digestive process energy is released from the nutrients that we eat and this

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What is ATP?

What is ATP?

What is ATP is a question that I get asked a lot. Most athletic have an understanding of what ATP is and that it provides the energy they need to perform. In my article Food: Nutrition Absorption and Delivery I discussed that after we eat a meal, the nutrients are digested, absorbed and screened by the liver and then sent into the bloodstream of the body to reach target cells. Once the nutrients reach their target cells a number of things can happen such as: 1) they are oxidized for energy production, 2) they are

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Food and Nutrition: Absorption and Delivery

Food and Nutrition Absorption and Delivery

Food and nutrition go hand-in-hand, and in this article we will take a look at how nutrients are absorbed and delivered throughout our body. Eating food is a daily activity that we partake in multiple times per day. Most of us are not concentrating on the nutritional value and the nutrients that are in the food, we are concentrating on the food itself and how it tastes. However, if you want to move close to living a fitness lifestyle, it is important to understand how food and nutrition interacts with our body.

Food and

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Proteins: A Look at the Cellular Level

Proteins: A Look at the Cellular Level

Proteins are an important component of every cell, tissue, and organ in our body. Proteins are the building block of bones, muscles, and more. In my article Good Nutrition and Nutritional Science I discussed how good nutrition effects our body at the cellular level. And I also discussed that it is at this cellular level that nearly every function that takes place in our bodies is dependent on the creation and production of proteins.

Let’s take a closer look at these cellular proteins and how good nutrition affects them. To understand

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